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A summary of Publishing 2.0 (a supplement of the Media Guardian)

Media Guardian produced a supplement discussing some of the recent changes in magazine and newspaper publishing (12.2.07) to coincide with the Publishing Expo at Olympia. I’ve provided links to the individual articles and a very brief summary of what I found interesting: 

1) PRINT TITLES BOOM IN DIGITAL AGE (Meg Carter)

  • Research from Deloitte: digital revenue accounted for 17% of UK publishers’ overall revenue. Publishers’ total revenue currently stand at £7bn a year.
  • Association of Online Publishers: 68% of magazine website users also read the parent magazine. It claims that this is proof that the audience is loyal to the brand.
  • Newspaper groups are re-branding to highlight their increasing cross-platform offerings. The Daily Telegraph has launched a new digital newsroom. VNU (publisher of Computing and ComputerActive) opened in-house audio and video studios in 2006.

2) COMPLIMENTARY SITES LEAD TO COMPLIMENTS (Kate Bulkley)

  • Dennis Publishing’s e-zine
    Monkey cost £150,000 to set up compared to the £7m
    and £5m respectively it cost IPC and Emap to launch print rivals Nuts
    and Zoo.
  • Monkey is said to have
    275,000 readers, while Nuts and Zoo have
    hit about the same number in sales each after three years.
  • NatMags has four online-only titles – led by handbag.com and
    getlippy.com. Nine of its biggest print magazine brands, including
    Cosmopolitan and Good Housekeeping, have active websites. Together,
    they are attracting 4.6 million unique users each month.
  • Nancy Cruickshank, managing director of Hearst Digital (part of NatMags): "We won’t be copying and pasting the magazine content and simply putting
    it online because there’s zero value there. Polls,
    competitions, additional footage, podcasts, vlogs – this is what will
    show up on our websites now."
  • Debate continues among traditional magazine publishers about launching
    online only websites and e-zines. At IPC, 90% of print
    brands including Loaded and What’s On TV now have a complementary
    website, but so far the company has no web-only brands.

3) ONLINE BREAKS DOWN THE BOUNDARIES (Kate Bulkley)

  • Monkey Magazine (Dennis): according to sources there are now over one million openings (or
    viewings) of the weekly online magazine each month; more than £16,000
    per issue in ad revenue in the first nine issues and 4,000 new readers signing up every day.
  • Readers spend an average of 45 minutes with the e-zine. 60% are from the ABC1 demographic group, with an average age of 27.
  • Neil Robinson, IPC Digital director: "The only reason Dennis launched Monkey is that they couldn’t afford to
    launch a print weekly"……"I doubt that Monkey will be the thing that overtakes Nuts and
    Zoo." Robinson believes in a big online future for publishers but that
    the "magazine-y" feel and the idea of "pushing content" to readers
    "just doesn’t work in a pull-environment like the web." [Ed’s comments: For what’s it’s worth – I tend to agree with Robinson. Also, I seriously question the "45 minute" statistic.

4) ON TRACK FOR A PUBLISHING REVOLUTION (Stephen Brook)

Top 10 performing magazine branded websites (Source: Nielsen NetRatings Oct 06). Based on unique audience in thousands.

1. AutoTrader – 1555
2. Which?- 653
3. Radio Times – 557
4. Time Out – 526
5. PC World – 316
6. Rolling Stone – 297
7. What Car? – 291
8. PC Pro -273
9. FHM – 256
10. Maxim – 214


5) THE CHANGING FACE OF PUBLISHING

  • David Renard, author of The Last Magazine: in the next 25 years, only
    10% of the European and American paper-based magazine industry will
    remain, kept alive by "connoisseurs, aficionados and ageing Luddites".
    The rest of us will embrace the publishing revolution. 
  • Sony introduced its e-book device last
    year, but Japanese company Fujitsu will launch what it claims is the
    first colour e-paper in 2008.
  • Mike Nelson, Fujitsu’s
    European general manager, e-paper is "exceptionally useful". "It looks
    like colour newsprint, it is tough, flexible, very thin and you could
    change the image on it every two seconds for a year using a triple-A
    battery."
  • Social Publishing: Ian Eckert, director of digital development at CMPi:"I don’t think we will get rid of journalists, but there will be less pontification from on high and more conversation."
  • Social Publishing: Dominic Williams, managing director of digital publishing technology company System 7: "Journalists will (increasingly) become freelance, but they will get a
    share of the advertising revenue if their stuff is read and will make a
    lot of money if they are at the top of the rankings."

One Response to A summary of Publishing 2.0 (a supplement of the Media Guardian)

  1. Kiran Bettadapur April 20, 2007 at 9:03 pm #

    I invite you to check out Cylive (http://www.cylive.com) – a Social Publishing platform.
    Please feel free to share your thoughts and views with me (kiran@cylive.com)